Recipes

Lip Gloss Stain

Fall is here just in time to highlight our lip gloss tubes with wand applicator.  Here is a simple formula to try at home with just a few ingredients:

96% soft oil of your choice.  (can be combined with several oils)

1% Cera Bellina wax (subst with regular beeswax)

1% Vitamin E oil 

*1% flavor( ensure is it oil based)

1% Mica or lake color of your choice (quantity depends on the color and intensity of the desired shade)

Melt the wax and oil at low heat on top of the stove in a small stainless steel measuring cup.  Keep your pot small for small recipes.  We used 1/4 cup for 2 x 11ml size lip gloss tubes. Remove from the heat and add your color and flavor, stir until totally combined.  The mixture will still be warm and can be poured within 1 or 2 minutes.   This recipe is not for lip balm roll-up tubes.  It has a much looser viscosity created especially for lip gloss tubes with wand applicator.

We used Abyssinian seed oil due to its comedogenic rating of 1 which signifies a very low chance of skin irritations.  It is a  very rich super light oil with no noticeable odor or flavor which does not interfere with the final product.

Shade test:  to see if you are happy with the color, take some and spread it onto a paper towel.  If it is not too hot, try some on the back of your hand.  Add more color if required.

*Cautionary note.  If using essential oils for flavor, do your homework.  Some essential oils can burn your lips with very little quantity.  Ones that come to mind:  peppermint, cinnamon & clove

Difference between Cera Bellina and regular beeswax are: Cera Bellina has more of a  satin-like feel on the skin,  less graininess or rice granule effects when using shea and other natural butters in anhydrous formulations., it  also helps to break up pigment cluster and by forming a gel network to maintain an even distribution of ingredients.

Recipes, Uncategorized

Solid Conditioner Bars for Hair

conditioning bar ingredients.pngSolid Conditioner Bars 6 x 35 gram bars

conditioning bar heated phase.pngconditioner bar melted phase

Heated Phase
130g BTMS-50 (conditioning emulsifying wax)
10
g  kokum butter (moisturizer promotes hair growth)
22g cetyl alcohol (helps thicken and with spreadability)
10g shea butter (moisturizer and softens frizzies)

conditioner bar cool down phase

Cool Down Phase
10g hydrolized honey protein (penetrates hair to provide moisture, shine, and luster. Improves wet-combability, reduces static buildup when dry combing.

24g panthenol powder (dilute in a little water)  (forms a smooth film over hair cuticles that enhance light reflection and makes tresses look shinier and glossier)                             

4g aloe juice (natural keratin aid to balance ph)                                                                 

4g hydrolized baobab protein (a great silicone replacement)

1g vitamin E oil (use the naturally derived kind)   (helps with hair growth & hair loss)     

4g hydrolized silk protein  (improves elasticity, resiliency, and restores the moisture balance)

1g optiphen plus (or another broad-spectrum preservative of choice at the recommended usage rate, as water will be introduced with usage, it is required)

1/2 to 1 tsp scent  

Weigh the heated phase ingredients into a small saucepan, and melt everything together over low medium heat. The temperature does not need to exceed 70C. (invest in a laser thermometer, it is well worth it).  Do not let it overheat.  This takes approx 12 minutes. We let some of the last bits melt within the warm mixture by removing from the heat.  If the mixture cools below 61C, the cool phase will bring up the temperature and start to harden your mixture. It can be reheated if required but is not recommended so as to not degrade any of your cooldown ingredients.

While the heated phase is melting, weigh all the cool down phase ingredients into a small container.

Add the cool phase to the heated phase and mix until combined. Your mixture will start to thicken and may want to work fast so as to have nice uniform bars.  Pour into your mold and put into the fridge for 15 minutes or so.  Let the bars sit for 24 hours.

Rub the bar in your hands at first then onto your wet hair. It will feel soft and silky, unlike a shampoo bar. Rinse and hand dry your hair.  As the conditioning is so high, color treated hair can benefit.   

Substitutions

  • The BTMS can be 50% 25 and 50% 50.  Not recommended to use 100% BTMS 25 as the 50 is more conditioning 
  • If you don’t have kokum butter, you can use cocoa butter instead. 
  • It is not recommended to use other emulsifying waxes as they lack conditioning that hair needs. 
  • Cetyl alcohol thickens and helps with a silky glide, unlike stearic acid that can be draggy.
  • You can omit the panthenol & hydrolyzed proteins but make it up in your BTMS

Essential Oil Ideas

Bergamot can be of great benefit to thin, dry hair that breaks.  It increases shine & can help make a protective barrier if you style your hair with heat.  If you have curly or frizzy hair try this Citrusy essential oil.  
Rosemary is great for thickening hair. It can help prevent baldness, slow the graying process and treating dandruff and dry scalp.
Chamomile essential oil is a great essential oil for hair because it adds shine and softness to your hair while soothing your scalp.  It can be used to lighten your hair naturally. 
Cedarwood essential oil can also help to reduce skin irritations and repel bugs, which can be beneficial on summer nights when you’re spending time outdoors
Lemongrass essential oil has healing properties, and it works as an effective cleanser and deodorizer. It can strengthen your hair follicles and soothe an itchy and irritated scalp. 
Peppermint essential oil helps to stimulate the scalp, and it can treat dandruff and even lice due to its powerful antiseptic properties.  It also stimulates hair growth.  Caution:  Don’t over do it, as it is a very strong essential oil

conditioner bars solid

 

Uncategorized

Say No to Hydrogenated Oils in Body Care

Do we really want to use hydrogenated oils in skin care?   The hydrogenated oil process is basically heating oils to a very high temperature which renders them rancid.  The oils are then treated with hydrogen. Many manufacturers add a perfume to neutralize the smell. The oils then become thick and spreadable.  This practice increases the shelf life of the oils.

I question heating oils at such high-temperatures.  It removes all the great properties we look for in crafting natural high-end body care.  Professional crafters take such pride to stand above the big commercial cosmetic manufacturers, we may want to consider upping our game by using nonhydrogenated virgin unrefined oils.  How do crafters label their products when using hydrogenated I wonder?

It is my goal to use virgin, cold pressed, unrefined and if possible organic oils.  Using these lovely oils does come with some caveats.  Virgin oils can have a shorter shelf life and are often not a neutral color. They can have a smell of the plant where the oils come from.  If you can live with that, go for it.  Virgin oils can also be a little more costly.

Coffee Butter  Non Hydrogenated

Let’s look at the coffee butter on the market.  Most contain hydrogenated vegetable oils  It looks great, smells wonderful that is true. It must be less expensive to produce and that means higher profit margins for the producer.  Soap & More manufactures their own coffee butter using refined coconut oil (no smell and a hard oil) combined with fair trade coffee infused MCT oil and coffee essential oil.  This is what makes us stand out as we continue to march to the beat of our own drum.  Most aloe vera butter on the market is also manufactured with the use of hydrogenated vegetable oils.  Keep an eye out for the inferior oils and butters.

Vegetable oils contain a number of nutrients that play an essential role in the metabolism of our skin.  They are at the basis for having lovely skin.  This is a good reason why one should make use of the vegetable oil properties, especially by mixing up their skincare uses, but one must first understand the way they should be extracted in order to get the best out of their use!

Vegetable oil is qualified as virgin or refined according to the way it has been extracted.  If the extraction is done by pressing, then it is considered virgin oil.  If the extraction is carried out by solvents, then it is called refined oil, which allows one to obtain a “standardized” oil by modifying its fatty acids.  But for the case of “virgin” oils, one gets an oil that is pure, without any foreign substances, exclusively purified through physical processes, and cannot have been submitted to any other treatments.

After refinement, degradation of the nutritional value occurs.  This means the natural Vitamin E  with its antioxidant regenerative and anti-inflammatory properties are gone.  The loss of the biological activity of essential fatty acids which are the base for a hydrated, plump, and dense skin, that is supple and luminous occurs.  The beta-carotene, a powerful antioxidant element is degraded as well as the disappearance of phospholipids and sterols that play a key role in cellular growth and the function of the skin’s plasma membrane.

Natural Body Care Products for the People who Want to Know!

Virgin versus refined carrier oils & butters

oil drop

My take is somewhat bias towards unrefined carrier oils & butters.  Embracing the natural essence of the oil or butter for all can do for your skin with as little processing is preferable.

What is the difference between virgin oil and refined oil?

Vegetable oil is qualified as virgin or refined according to the way it has been extracted.  If the extraction is done by pressing, then it is considered virgin oil.  If the extraction is carried out by solvents and heat, then it is called refined oil, which allows one to obtain a “standardized” oil by modifying its fatty acids. Cosmetic companies prefer a more standardized oil with little or no color and no aroma.   But for the case of “virgin” oils & butters, one gets an oil that is pure, without any foreign substances, exclusively purified through physical processes.

Why refine oils?

The refining process creates oil that is stable, easy to preserve, hardly colored, with no discernable aroma, and with a yield around 97 percent which is much more profitable to the industry.  Refining can also extend the shelf life of carrier oils.  However “pressed” oils preserve all their qualities, are more expensive, and can lose up to 20 percent of its substance when extracted.

Which one is best for my skin?

After refinement, the original composition of the oil has been deeply modified that results in an almost total loss of the healing active properties.  Refining can cause:

• a destruction of vitamin E, with its antioxidant, regenerative and anti-inflammatory properties

• the disappearance and/or the loss of the biological activity of essential fatty acids which are the base for a hydrated, plump, and dense skin, that is supple and luminous

• the disappearence of beta-carotene, a powerful antioxidant element

• even the disappearence of phospholipids and sterols that play a key role in cellular growth and the function of the plasma membrane

We encourage choosing virgin oils & butters for a healthy and beautiful skin.

Recipes, Soap Recipes

Jelly Soap (Vegan)

Jelly soaps are so much fun and kids love them. They are jiggly, sparkly soapy fun!

  jelly soap

FORMULA

225 ml  glycerin
1 TB  carrageenan iota powder
200 ml distilled/purified water
25 grams Lanthanol

Cool down phase ingredients:
25ml  Cocamidopropyl Betaine 
1 tsp optiphen (the very high % of glycerin contributes greatly to preservation in this formula)
1 tsp fractionated coconut oil or almond oil or rice bran oil
1/4 tsp essential oil or fragrance oil
1/8 tsp color powder in 1 tsp water and stir until combined

Important tips:

If the recipe does not set add 10% more carrageenan.  (Another reason why the shower jelly may not harden could be the mix was not heated to a sufficiently high temperature).

  • To color, use dilute your powdered colorant in water.  Micas add sparkle to your creation.
  • hand stirring can be used.   (A stick blender will create lots of foam).

Process:

  1. In an empty container add the glycerin
  2. Add the carrageenan into the glycerin and mix well
  3. In a separate pan add distilled or deionized water and heat
  4. Add the lanthanol into the water whilst mixing and heating using a stick blender
  5. Add the carrageenan/glycerin mix to the lanthanol/water mix and heat to 200°F/95°C.
  6. In a separate container combine the cool down phase ingredients, which are: optiphen, Cocamidopropyl Betaine, oil, fragrance
  7. Let the heated mixture cool to below 140°F/60°C and before it starts to gel, add color and stir
  8. Add the cool down phase ingredients, stir
  9. Pour into preferable silicone molds or an ice cube mold
  10. Let the shower jelly cool and set before unmoulding
  11. Have fun!
Recipes, Soap Recipes

Gentle Solid Shampoo Bars: Yields 2 x 80g bars

 

There has been some talk about solid shampoo bars having high PH which is not particularly good for hair.  A nice, PH balanced shampoo will keep your hair and scalp in good condition.  It is all about the chosen surfactants.

We will keep updating and adding great information for changing up the formula for an enhanced finished product.

Benefits of our Solid Shampoo (Syndet)

  • Ease of travel
  • Gentle and silky
  • Easy to make
  • Low PH

The word “syndet” is derived from “synthetic” combined with “detergent”. Technically it refers to the binding that occurs between different detergents, also called surfactants. These detergents, which have an affinity for oils and repel water, surround dirt with small structures that are then removed by water.

Gentle Solid Shampoo Bar Recipe Yield approx 300 grams 

1st Heated phase

1 3/4 tsp 1.7% Cocamidopropyl betaine (heat separately and add the panthenol powder if using it) Surfactant 
5.5 TB SCI 37.7% Sodium Cocoyl Isethionate gentle surfactant (crush up in a baggie if not using a powdered form.  Melting is preferred to pressing your surfactant. 
2nd Heated Phase
1 3/4 tsp 3.4% Kokum butter. (if using volume and not % melt to measure)  Moisturizer & conditioner
1 3/4 tsp 3.4% BTMS 50 Conditioning emulsifier or BTMS 25 Conditioning emulsifier 
1  tsp 1.9% Cetyl Alcohol  emollient, emulsifier

3/4 tsp 1.5% protein of choice (Hydrolyzed Silk or Baobab Protein)  improves elasticity, resiliency, and restore the moisture balance for smoother and softer hair.

1/4 cup plus 2 tsp 33.28% Lathanol SLSA, Sodium lauryl Sulfocete. Surfactant powder for foam. 

Cool-down phase 

2 TB 13.7% Coco Symplex Mild surfactant can be substituted with coco glucoside, Amphosol CG, BSB or Bio-Terge  

Optional

1 tsp 2.28% Panthenol powder  Humectant that helps give body & shine and detangling properties to hair. It can cause curly hair to frizz, however.  If you omit this, add this % to the SCI or SLSA (add to 1 heated phase.  Be careful to not let it burn)

1/2 tsp .57% scent  (more can be added depending on your choice of scent)

Optional: Water soluble dye or micas for color

 Directions:

Melt your 1st heated phase over the stove at medium heat.  At the same time in a separate vessel heat, your 2nd heated phase by totally melting the kokum butter then add remainder of the 2nd heated phase and continue to heat until melted. Combine both heated phases mix well and remove from the heat.  If you find the 1st heated phase needs more moisture, multiply the Cocamidopropyl betaine by up to 3 times.  It may take your final bar longer to harden.

Mix in your cool down phase.  If adding color, this is the time.  

Allow to cool to 80 Degrees Celsius or less and mix in the Optiphen Plus, and scent, color (judge this and use sparingly) if using and combine.

Press tightly into your mold and allow to firm up. (Not a smooth batter so beware) Your mold can be placed in the freezer for a couple of hours.  No need to cure or cover.  Can be used after 24 hours.  Lather the bar in your hands at first, add to your wet hair and then use the bar directly on your hair for more lather.

Essential Oil Ideas

Bergamot can be of great benefit to thin, dry hair that breaks.  It increases shine & can help make a protective barrier if you style your hair with heat.  If you have curly or frizzy hair try this Citrusy essential oil.  
Rosemary is great for thickening hair. It can help prevent baldness, slow the graying process and treating dandruff and dry scalp.
Chamomile essential oil is a great essential oil for hair because it adds shine and softness to your hair while soothing your scalp.  It can be used to lighten your hair naturally. 
Cedarwood essential oil can also help to reduce skin irritations and repel bugs, which can be beneficial on summer nights when you’re spending time outdoors
Lemongrass essential oil has healing properties, and it works as an effective cleanser and deodorizer. It can strengthen your hair follicles and soothe an itchy and irritated scalp. 
Peppermint essential oil helps to stimulate the scalp, and it can treat dandruff and even lice due to its powerful antiseptic properties.  It also stimulates hair growth.  Caution:  Don’t over do it, as it is a very strong essential oil
Recipes, Soap Recipes

Soap Dough

Soap dough is so easy to create for cp soapers who already know how to make cold process soap.  Simply use a 5% superfat and your water at 2.5 times your lye. If a softer dough is desired, use 3 times water to lye. This soap does not go through gel phase. Put your recipe through the soap calculator.

Once the soap comes to a light trace, divide it into how many colors you wish and add your color and stir until there are no clumps.  Store in plastic cups with lids or plastic wrap.

Do not let air touch your soap dough when storing.  You can wrap in plastic wrap and put into bags upon unmolding.

The fun begins when molding your own creations such as small owls, flowers, bird nests or anything to embellish your soap. Small cookie cutters can also be used.

soap dough (2)